Hiking opportunities in Potter-Tioga

Leonard Harrison State Park

Hiking: 4.6 miles of trails
The trails lead to many beautiful vistas and waterfalls, but traverse very rugged terrain, pass close to many steep cliffs, and may have slippery surfaces. Trails are subject to seasonal closure due to snow and ice, usually from December through April.

Caution! Hikers on the Turkey Path Trail should be in good physical condition, wear sturdy boots, and use caution due to slippery/wet conditions and steep trail sections.

The following guidelines will help ensure a safe and enjoyable hiking experience while at the park.

  • Always wear sturdy boots. Wearing sneakers, sandals, water shoes, and "street shoes" can lead to serious accidents in this park.
  • Be prepared. Have proper clothing and equipment (compass, map, matches, water, food, flashlight, etc.) available in case of an emergency. This is especially important when traveling remote trails or when hiking during non-summer seasons.
  • Give yourself plenty of time for your hike. The weather changes quickly in the park. Plan to be off the trails well before dark.
  • Let someone know where you are hiking and when you should return.
  • Stay on the trails. Leaving the trail causes damage to unique natural resources, promotes erosion, and can be dangerous. Stay behind the railings and fences. Avoid the temptation to get on rock overhangs for a better view.
  • Don't take shortcuts from one trail section to another. Taking shortcuts down switchbacks is dangerous and causes trail damage.

Turkey Path Trail: 2 miles round trip, most difficult hiking
This difficult trail descends one mile to the bottom of Pine Creek Gorge. It is a down and back trail. There is no bridge across Pine Creek at the bottom. The top half of the trail descends through a series of switchbacks to a view of Little Four-Mile Run at 0.5 miles, then on a short distance to the first waterfall. The trail continues downward along narrow switchbacks and wooden decking, bridges, and steps. The lowest parts of the trail are along a series of waterfalls. The trail ends at the Pine Creek Trail. Major improvements on the Turkey Path Trail, including steps, observation decks, and hand rails were completed by the Pennsylvania Conservation Corps in 1993.

Overlook Trail: 0.6 mile, more difficult hiking
This loop passes Otter View, a vista looking south.

Colton Point State Park

Hiking: 4 miles of trails
The trails lead to many beautiful vistas and waterfalls, but traverse very rugged terrain, pass close to many steep cliffs, and may have slippery surfaces. Trails are subject to seasonal closure due to snow and ice, usually from December through April.

Caution! Hikers on the Turkey Path Trail should be in good physical condition, wear sturdy boots, and use caution due to slippery/wet conditions and steep trail sections.

The following guidelines will help ensure a safe and enjoyable hiking experience while at the park.

  • Always wear sturdy boots. Wearing sneakers, sandals, water shoes, and "street shoes" can lead to serious accidents in this park.
  • Be prepared. Have proper clothing and equipment (compass, map, matches, water, food, flashlight, etc.) available in case of an emergency. This is especially important when traveling remote trails or when hiking during non-summer seasons.
  • Give yourself plenty of time for your hike. The weather changes quickly in the park. Plan to be off the trails well before dark.
  • Let someone know where you are hiking and when you should return.
  • Stay on the trails. Leaving the trail causes damage to unique natural resources, promotes erosion, and can be dangerous. Stay behind the railings and fences. Avoid the temptation to get on rock overhangs for a better view.
  • Don't take shortcuts from one trail section to another. Taking shortcuts down switchbacks is dangerous and causes trail damage.

Rim Trail: 1 mile, easiest hiking
Not to be confused with the West Rim Trail, Rim Trail follows the perimeter of the 'point' and links all of the overlook view areas together into a wonderful and mostly flat hike.

Turkey Path: 3 miles round trip, difficult hiking
This difficult trail descends 1.5 miles to the floor of the canyon. The highlight is a 70-foot cascading waterfall less than 0.5 mile down. The lowest parts of the trail are along a series of waterfalls. It is a down and back trail. There is no bridge across Pine Creek at the bottom.

Suquehannock Trail
Susquehannock State Forest

The Susquehannock Trail System is an 85-mile loop. The STS meanders through the remote and unspoiled woodlands of Pennsylvania's Susquehannock State Forest. The loop extends from the trail's northern gateway atop Denton Hill on US Rt 6 at the PA Bureau of Forestry building to below the Potter-Clinton County border at its southern end.The STS passes within a mile of Lyman Run State Park, near Cherry Springs State Park, thru Ole Bull State Park, thru the village of Cross Fork, near Pourty Place Picnic Area, and thru Patterson Park Picnic Area.

The STS links old Civilian Conservation Corps fire trails, abandoned railroad grades and logging roads. The system is marked with a uniform system of 2 x 6 inch vertical orange paint blazes. Parking areas are marked on the Susquehannock State Forest Public Use Map and the STS Trail Guide and Map. Visit the Susquehannock Forest District Office on Rt. 6 in Potter County for more information.

West Rim Trail
Tioga State Forest

The West Rim Trail is a 30 mile hiking trail located adjacent to the Western Rim of Pennsylvania's Grand Canyon. The northern section of the canyon is about 800 feet deep and about 2,000 feet from rim to rim.

The exposed rock is estimated to be more than 350 million years old. Most of the important geologic process which formed the canyon as it now exists occurred less than 20,000 years ago. Before glacial activity took place in the present Canyon area, the headwaters of Pine Creek took a northeastern drainage course. Glaciers deposited a blanket og gravel, sand and clay blocking the flow of Pine Creek. This natural dam forced Pine Creek to reverse its flow and drain to the south. This overflow cut through the drainage divide and formed the canyon.

The trail offers spectacular views of the Canyon. In some spots the trail follows the very rim of the Canyon, so watch your step.